Basic maintenance guide for Stainless Steel - New Edge Security Door
Basic maintenance guide for Stainless Steel - New Edge Security Door
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How to maintain your stainless steel series New Edge Safety & Security Door ?

Basic maintenance guide for Stainless Steel

You may be asking, why do we need to do maintenance on your stainless steel door ? Here’s a few reason why stainless steel door can still be stained by rusts or develop rusts and how you can prevent it.

Can stainless steel rust ?

Yes, stainless steel is very less likely to rust but it can indeed develop rust.  The general perception towards stainless steel is that it is the perfect alloy that will never rusts. Well, this assumption in fact not true. The word “stain-less” does not imply 100% stain or rust resistance. It simply means that the alloy stains less or less likely to stain.

What conditions can cause stainless steel to rust ?

Pitting Corrosion – This type of corrosion that takes place in stainless steel when it is exposed to environments that contain chlorides.

Bimetallic/galvanic corrosion – When dissimilar metals in a common electrolyte come into contact with another, then galvanic corrosion can happen. The most common scenario is stainless steels corroding in rain.

General Corrosion – When the stainless steel is exposed to acidic conditions / low pH, general corrosion will occur.

What can we do to prevent stainless steel from rust and stains?

Cleaning up stainless steel rust

Stainless steel cleaning or rust removal solutions are available at hardware stores. After cleaning and stain removal, it will be highly recommended that you re-passivating the surface to ensure that corrosion doesn’t recur on the same surface again. You may also find surface passivating products on hardware stores.

Wikipedia:

Passivation, in physical chemistry and engineering, refers to a material becoming “passive,” that is, less affected or corroded by the environment of future use. Passivation involves creation of an outer layer of shield material that is applied as a microcoating, created by chemical reaction with the base material, or allowed to build from spontaneous oxidation in the air. As a technique, passivation is the use of a light coat of a protective material, such as metal oxide, to create a shell against corrosion.

 

Common Household Cleaning and Care Guide.

If you will not like to head to the hardware stores for expensive rust fixes, you may try this common household method. (Before you proceed please read our disclaimer below.)
Please make sure any wiping cloth or liquid is suitable for your stainless steel and all wiping cloth / liquid is free from debris that may scratch or damage your stainless steel surface.

Method 1

  1. Determine the direction of the grain: Look closely for the stainless steel a grain. It will either be running horizontally or vertically. To clean your stainless steel, rub in the same direction of that grain.
  2. Do a preliminary clean of your appliance with white vinegar: Spray your appliance liberally with white vinegar, this will help soften and dissolve some stains.
  3. Wipe it down: Use a paper towel or a very soft cloth, wipe the vinegar off in the direction of the grain. This should remove the initial debris and basic stains from your stainless steel and it will start to shine it up a bit.
  4. Dip your soft cloth into a little bit of oil: Wipe in the direction of the grain with the oiled cloth. You will start to see the marks reduced and disappear! You stainless steel grille / door will look new again!

Method 2

  1. Determine the direction of the grain: Look closely for the stainless steel a grain. It will either be running horizontally or vertically. To clean your stainless steel, rub in the same direction of that grain.
  2. Rub stains gently with WD-40 (Not for Stainless Steel Kitchenwares): Spray a small amount of WD-40 on soft cloth and gentle rub on stained surfaces. For tougher stains, spray WD-40 directly on the area and rub gently till stains are removed.
  3. Clean off the oil: Wipe clean contaminated oil from stainless steel with clean cloth or gently wipe with towel tissue.
  4. Add a thin layer of coating : Spray very small amount of WD-40 on a new cloth and wipe throughout the stainless steel to give it some shine and a thin layer of any moisture coating.

Disclaimer,
Please take extra precaution when doing the cleaning yourself. We recommend following the instructions provided by the cleaning or passivation products. We recommend getting a professional to work on your expensive stainless steel products. The above guides are to educate everyone about the basic cleaning method for mild stains

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